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In 2015, over 4.14 million animal experiments were completed in the UK alone. All over the world, millions of animals are bred and killed in barbaric and futile research. From genetically-modified mice, to macaques captured from the wilds – it is a big, global and growing business that affect us all.

Modern research, utilising non-animal methods is, however, more accurate and effective in finding treatments for illnesses and disease. It therefore has the potential to save more human and non-human lives.

Animal Justice Project has uncovered, as part of its ‘Deadly Doses: A Legal Low’ campaign, that universities across the UK are carrying out extensive studies on animals using recreational drugs. These cruel animal experiments reveal very little, if anything, about the harmful effects of recreational drugs in humans. The differences between, for example, a mouse and a human are simply too great, and include extremely obvious differences in anatomy, physiology and behaviour. Non-animal studies are undoubtedly the most accurate way of investigating the effects of recreational drug use in humans. Human volunteers can, and are, used to study the short-term effects of, for example, Class A drugs in controlled studies. Animals are even more unsuitable for studying the long-term effects of recreational drug use in humans.

It is an injustice that the UK Government continues to plough money into animal experiments in recreational drug research, rather than using public funds to help educate the public about the consequences of taking these drugs in the first place, improving treatments in specialist clinics, and the safe and effective rehabilitation of ex-drug users into society. We urge the UK government to follow suit and take immediate steps to ban these obscene and futile animal experiments in recreational drugs research. Please, sign our Pledge to show your support for an end of the use of animals in recreational drug studies, and advocate for the use of non-animal research.

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